New Frank Norris Society Site and American Literary Naturalism Newsletter Archive

cropped-norris-bannerThe Frank Norris Society has a beautiful new site at http://franknorrissociety.org/, courtesy of Eric Carl Link, Steven Frye, and Hannah Huber.  There you can find a membership form and also the back issues of The American Literary Naturalism Newsletterwhich is indexed by the MLA.   

Congratulations to the FNS for putting together this resource!

Bitter Tastes: Which American Women Writers?

 In case you were curious about which “American Women Writers” are in Bitter Tastes, they include the following:

  • Bess Streeter Aldrich
  • Mary Austin
  • Estelle Baker
  • Madeleine Blair
  • Virginia Brooks
  • Willa Cather
  • Kate Chopin
  • Kate Cleary
  • Rebecca Harding Davis
  • Mary Hallock Foote
  • Mary Wilkins Freeman
  • Alice Dunbar-Nelson
  • Sui Sin Far
  • Edna Ferber
  • Zona Gale
  • Ellen Glasgow
  • Emanuel and Anna Marcet Haldeman-Julius
  • Fannie Hurst
  • Edith Summers Kelley
  • Nella Larsen
  • Batterman Lindsay
  • Miriam Michelson
  • Elia Peattie
  • Ann Petry
  • Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
  • Elizabeth Robins
  • Evelyn Scott
  • Gertrude Stein
  • Edith Wharton
  • Lillie Buffum Chace Wyman
  • with side trips to Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, W. D. Howells, Theodore Dreiser, Harold Frederic, and Jack London. (Also, as the title says, silent films.)

Mark Twain Newspaper Stories Discovered

Samuel Langhorne Clemens September 1-2, 1867, Pera, Constantinople

Samuel Langhorne Clemens
September 1-2, 1867, Pera, Constantinople

From the Los Angeles Times, news of a cache of Mark Twain’s stories:

Scholars at UC Berkeley have tracked down 110 early newspaper columns written by Mark Twain that, up until now, had been considered lost. The Associated Press reports that the Mark Twain Project at Berkeley, which unearthed the columns, plans to publish them in a forthcoming book.

In 1865 and ’66, Twain wrote a six-day-a-week column about San Francisco for the Territorial Enterprise of Virginia City, Nev. Both cities were mining boom towns — Virginia City with silver, and San Francisco with gold — taking hold on the Western frontier. Twain’s column took the form of a “letter from San Francisco” about life there.

Twain, then 29, wrote humorously about miners, cops and corruption. It was early in his career, and the letters show him finding his voice.

“This is a very special period in his life, when he’s out here in San Francisco,” Bob Hirst, general editor of the Mark Twain Project, told the AP. “He’s utterly free, he’s not encumbered by a marriage or much of anything else, and he can speak his mind and does speak his mind. These things are wonderful to read, the ones that survived.”

Twain’s stories had been lost when the archives of the Territorial Enterprise were destroyed in a series of fires. Scholars at Berkeley combed through the archives of other Western papers searching for reprints of those columns, many of which were unsigned.

http://www.latimes.com/books/jacketcopy/la-et-jc-lost-mark-twain-stories-recovered-by-berkeley-scholars-20150505-story.html

An article from The Guardian: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/may/04/mark-twain-cache-uncovered-berkeley#img-1

Here’s a direct link to the stories: http://www.theguardian.com/books/ng-interactive/2015/may/04/mark-twain-san-francisco-cache